By Jared S. Renfroe

Carrie Robinson v. Vanderbilt University

Docket No. 2016-06-1563

State File No. 48284-2016

Filed April 18, 2017

Summary

This case involves alleged injuries that occurred as a result of repetitive activities, but was not reported until approximately eight months after the employee retired.

Facts

In this case, the employee, Carrie Robinson, alleged suffering injuries to her back and neck as a result of repetitive lifting of items in a market at Vanderbilt University.  She alleged a date of injury of June 1, 2015. Ms. Robinson retired from her employment effective August 1, 2015 without having given notice of a work injury.  The first notice of alleged injuries to her employer, dated April 26, 2016, was undisputed. Her employer denied the claim, however, and Ms. Robinson then filed a Petition for Benefit Determination.  After an expedited hearing, the court found that Ms. Robinson had failed to file her claim within the time period required by Tennessee Code Annotated § 50-6-203 and denied her request for benefits.

Holding

The employee appealed to the Appeals Board, but she provided no argument or explanation on appeal identifying or describing any errors she contends that were made by the trial court. Therefore applying well established law that it is not the role of the courts to research or construct a litigant’s case or arguments for her, the Appeals Board affirmed the decision of the trial court.

 

Jared S. Renfroe is an attorney for Spicer Rudstrom PLLC. He focuses his legal practice on litigation throughout Tennessee. His concentrates primarily in premises liability, business and commercial representation, employment practices litigation, professional liability, insurance defense and workers’ compensation.

 

Related Articles

Employee Not Entitled to Hip Replacement Surgery after Compensable Fall Causing Left Hip Injury Due to Pre-Existing Condition

Five-Employee Threshold

How Untimely Submission of Evidence Affected Case of Injured Truck Driver